Symptoms of a Broken Toe

The symptoms may be similar in sprained and broken toes, and it may be difficult to determine the extent of the injury. If the bone is intact, it is most likely a sprained toe, and one or more broken bones are indicative of a fractured toe. There are several symptoms that are associated with broken toes, including severe discomfort and pain beginning at the time of the injury, bruising on the toe and surrounding area, in addition to the inability to walk and put weight on it. Two common causes for broken toes to occur may include stubbing it against something hard or dropping a heavy object on it. Once a proper diagnosis is performed, which typically consists of having an X-ray taken, it will be confirmed if the toe is broken. At this time, the correct treatment procedure can begin, which will generally include resting the toe, and splinting it to the toe next to it, which may aid in stabilizing it. If you feel you have broken your toe, it is recommended that you speak to a podiatrist as quickly as possible, so a proper diagnosis can be determined.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact the podiatrists from Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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