What Causes a Blister to Develop?

If you frequently run or wear shoes that are too tight, you may develop a blister. This may be a result of excess friction that occurs on a portion of the skin. A blister is defined as a small bubble that is filled with clear liquid and may naturally drain when the affected area of skin has healed. The top layer of the skin may become raw and painful, and the body’s natural defense mechanism may be to develop a blister, which will protect the skin that has been damaged. There may be additional reasons for blisters to develop, which may include allergic reactions, sunburns, or medical conditions such as impetigo. If a blister should become infected, it may appear to be yellow or green, in addition to possibly causing pain and discomfort. If you have a blister on your foot that will not heal, it is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist.

Blisters may appear as a single bubble or in a cluster. They can cause a lot of pain and may be filled with pus, blood, or watery serum. If your feet are hurting, contact the podiatrists of Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters are often the result of friction. This happens due to the constant rubbing from shoes, which can lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

Symptoms

(Blister symptoms may vary depending on what is causing them)

Prevention & Treatment

In order to prevent blisters, you should be sure to wear comfortable shoes with socks that cushion your feet and absorb sweat. Breaking a blister open may increase your chances of developing an infection. However, if your blister breaks, you should wash the area with soap and water immediately and then apply a bandage to the affected area. If your blisters cause severe pain it is important that you call your podiatrist right away.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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