Bunion Foot Surgery

Foot surgery can sound intimidating, but it is actually common among those with foot complications. There a few common issues that when severe enough, can lead to foot surgery. Bunions are one of these issues. Usually, bunions can be treated in ways that do not require surgery, but there are some instances where surgery is the best option to alleviate the uncomfortable or painful symptoms associated with bunions. Bunions result in a protrusion under the big toe, this protrusion is caused by the joint under the big toe bending and becoming deformed. High heels are a common cause for bunions, because they contort these bones. The surgery for bunions is not too complicated, the surgeon performs an osteotomy, which is the straightening of the big toe and metatarsals. After the surgery is done, the recovery period is usually six weeks. If you are concerned about your bunion, then it is highly recommended that you speak with a podiatrist to learn about the right treatment options for you.

Foot surgery is sometimes necessary to treat a foot ailment. To learn more, contact the podiatrists of Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

When Is Surgery Necessary?

Foot and ankle surgery is generally reserved for cases in which less invasive, conservative procedures have failed to alleviate the problem. Some of the cases in which surgery may be necessary include:

What Types of Surgery Are There?

The type of surgery you receive will depend on the nature of the problem you have. Some of the possible surgeries include:

Benefits of Surgery

Although surgery is usually a last resort, it can provide more complete pain relief compared to non-surgical methods and may allow you to finally resume full activity.

Surgical techniques have also become increasingly sophisticated. Techniques like endoscopic surgery allow for smaller incisions and faster recovery times.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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