How Did I Get My Flat Feet?

People who have the condition known as fallen arches, or flat feet, generally have feet that roll inward due to lack of arches. Both feet lie flat on the ground while standing, and this may cause shoes to wear out faster than usual, or wear out unevenly. Possible symptoms of this ailment may include swelling around the ankle and surrounding areas, and many patients experience pain in the feet because the ligaments and muscles may be strained. Research has shown the purpose of the arch is to evenly distribute weight across the feet, which supports the body. If the arch is absent, the feet may undergo stress in addition to damage being done to the tendons and ligaments. Having flat feet is a common foot condition, resulting from numerous causes. These may include inherited traits, injuries to the foot and ankle, or muscle diseases such as cerebral palsy. If you have the condition referred to as flat feet, please speak with a podiatrist who can properly guide you to correct treatment options.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact the podiatrists from Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

 

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