Possible Causes of Gout

The painful condition that is known as gout is a form of arthritis. The pain is a result of excess uric acid that accumulates in the blood. This may cause crystals to form, which lodge in the joints of the big toe, and any inflammation that may occur will typically cause severe pain. This condition may develop if certain foods are ingested in excess on a frequent basis. These may include shellfish, red meat, or alcohol, and it is suggested to alter these choices for the possible prevention of gout. Research has shown there may be other factors why gout may develop, including genetic traits, ingesting specific medications, or enduring a recent trauma. If you feel you have gout, it is suggested to speak with a podiatrist as quickly as possible, so correct treatment options can be implemented.

Gout is a foot condition that requires certain treatment and care. If you are seeking treatment, contact the podiatrists from Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Is Gout?

Gout is a type of arthritis caused by a buildup of uric acid in the bloodstream. It often develops in the foot, especially the big toe area, although it can manifest in other parts of the body as well. Gout can make walking and standing very painful and is especially common in diabetics and the obese.

People typically get gout because of a poor diet. Genetic predisposition is also a factor. The children of parents who have had gout frequently have a chance of developing it themselves.

Gout can easily be identified by redness and inflammation of the big toe and the surrounding areas of the foot. Other symptoms include extreme fatigue, joint pain, and running high fevers. Sometimes corticosteroid drugs can be prescribed to treat gout, but the best way to combat this disease is to get more exercise and eat a better diet.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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