Where are Corns Located?

A corn on the foot is a small, hardened portion of skin that develops as a result of excess friction which occurs to that part of the foot. They are known to develop in specific areas of the foot, which often includes the sides or bottom of the feet, between the toes, or possibly underneath the toenail bed. They can be quite painful, especially while wearing shoes, and may appear to have a rough texture. Common reasons why corns may develop can come from wearing shoes that are too tight, or from standing or walking for extended periods of time. Mild relief may be found by putting a corn pad over the affected area, and this may be effective in relieving a portion of the pressure. If you have a corn that will not heal, it is suggested to speak with a podiatrist who can offer additional treatment options.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact the podiatrists of Apple Podiatry Group. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Arlington and Irving, TX. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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